Publications

H.-J. Gehrke et H. Schneider (éd.), Geschichte der Antike. Ein Studienbuch

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Hans-Joachim Gehrke et Helmut Schneider (éd.), Geschichte der Antike. Ein Studienbuch. 5. Auflage, Stuttgart, 2019.

Éditeur : JB Metzler Verlag
672 pages
ISBN : 978-3-476-04761-8
29 €


Alles Wissenswerte zur Geschichte der Griechen und Römer. Vom Alten Orient bis zur Spätantike zeichnet das anschaulich aufbereitete Studienbuch die politischen, gesellschaftlichen, rechtlichen, wirtschaftlichen und kulturellen Entwicklungen nach. Die Beziehungen der Griechen zum Vorderen Orient und zu Ägypten, die Rolle der Etrusker, der Phönizier und Karthagos erhalten besondere Aufmerksamkeit. Im Text sind die Nummern des ergänzenden Quellenbandes verzeichnet für eine optimale parallele Benutzung. Abgerundet wird das Werk durch den aktuellen und umfangreichen Anhang, unter anderen mit Zeittafel, Angaben zu Maßen, Geldsystemen und zum Geldwert, mit Quelleneditionen, Abkürzungen, Bibliografie, Glossar, Stammtafeln, Karten und einer Aufstellung römischer Kaiser.

 

Source : Springer

 

S. M. Goldberg (éd.), Fragmentary Republican Latin, Vol. II: Ennius, Dramatic Fragments. Minor Works

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Sander M. Goldberg (éd.), Fragmentary Republican Latin, Volume II: Ennius, Dramatic Fragments. Minor Works, Cambridge (Ma), 2018.

Éditeur : Harvard University Press
Collection : Loeb Classical Library 537
450 pages
ISBN : 9780674997141
21 €

Quintus Ennius (239–169 BC), widely regarded as the father of Roman literature, was instrumental in creating a new Roman literary identity and inspired major developments in Roman religion, social organization, and popular culture. Brought in 204 to Rome in the entourage of Cato, Ennius took up residence on the Aventine and, fluent in his native Oscan as well as Greek and Latin, became one of the first teachers to introduce Greek learning to Romans through public readings of Greek and Latin texts.
Best known for domesticating Greek epic and drama, Ennius also pursued a wide range of literary endeavors and found success in almost all of them. His tragedies were long regarded as classics of the genre, and his Annals gave Roman epic its canonical shape and pioneered many of its most characteristic features. Other works included philosophical works in prose and verse, epigrams, didactic poems, dramas on Roman themes (praetextae), and occasional poetry that informed the later development of satire.

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S. M. Goldberg (éd.), Fragmentary Republican Latin, Vol. I: Ennius, Testimonia. Epic Fragments

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Sander M. Goldberg (éd.), Fragmentary Republican Latin. Volume I: Ennius, Testimonia. Epic Fragments, Cambridge (Ma), 2018.

Éditeur : Harvard University Press
Collection : Loeb Classical Library 294
475 pages
ISBN : 9780674997011
21 €

Quintus Ennius (239–169 BC), widely regarded as the father of Roman literature, was instrumental in creating a new Roman literary identity and inspired major developments in Roman religion, social organization, and popular culture. Brought in 204 to Rome in the entourage of Cato, Ennius took up residence on the Aventine and, fluent in his native Oscan as well as Greek and Latin, became one of the first teachers to introduce Greek learning to Romans through public readings of Greek and Latin texts.
Best known for domesticating Greek epic and drama, Ennius also pursued a wide range of literary endeavors and found success in almost all of them. His tragedies were long regarded as classics of the genre, and his Annals gave Roman epic its canonical shape and pioneered many of its most characteristic features. Other works included philosophical works in prose and verse, epigrams, didactic poems, dramas on Roman themes (praetextae), and occasional poetry that informed the later development of satire.
This two-volume edition of Ennius, which inaugurates the Loeb series Fragmentary Republican Latin, replaces that of Warmington in Remains of Old Latin, Volume I and offers fresh texts, translations, and annotation that are fully current with modern scholarship.

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St. Martin (dir.), Rural Granaries in Northern Gaul (Sixth Century BCE – Fourth Century CE)

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Stéphane Martin (dir.), Rural Granaries in Northern Gaul (Sixth Century BCE – Fourth Century CE), Leyde-Boston, 2019.

Éditeur : Brill
Collection : Radboud Studies in Humanities
196 pages
ISBN : 978-90-04-38904-5
— (open access)

 

In recent years, storage has come to the fore as a central aspect of ancient economies. However studies have hitherto focused on urban and military storage. Although archaeological excavations of rural granaries are numerous, their evidence has yet to be fully taken into account. Such is the ambition of Rural Granaries in Northern Gaul (Sixth Century BCE – Fourth Century CE). Focusing on northern Gaul, this volume starts by discussing at length the possibility of quantifying storage capacities and, through them, agrarian production. Building on this first part, the second half of the book sketches the evolution of rural storage in Gaul from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity, setting firmly archaeological evidence in the historical context of the Roman Empire.

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A. Kaldellis, Romanland. Ethnicity and Empire in Byzantium

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Anthony Kaldellis, Romanland. Ethnicity and Empire in Byzantium, Cambridge (Ma), 2019.

Éditeur : Harvard University Press
392 pages
ISBN : 9780674986510
41 €

A leading historian argues that in the empire we know as Byzantium, the Greek-speaking population was actually Roman, and scholars have deliberately mislabeled their ethnicity for the past two centuries for political reasons.
Was there ever such a thing as Byzantium? Certainly no emperor ever called himself “Byzantine.” And while the identities of minorities in the eastern empire are clear—contemporaries speak of Slavs, Bulgarians, Armenians, Jews, and Muslims—that of the ruling majority remains obscured behind a name made up by later generations.
Historical evidence tells us unequivocally that Byzantium's ethnic majority, no less than the ruler of Constantinople, would have identified as Roman. It was an identity so strong in the eastern empire that even the conquering Ottomans would eventually adopt it. But Western scholarship has a long tradition of denying the Romanness of Byzantium. In Romanland, Anthony Kaldellis investigates why and argues that it is time for the Romanness of these so-called Byzantines to be taken seriously.

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W. Robins, Historia Apollonii regis Tyri. A Fourteenth Century Version of a Late Antique Romance

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William Robins, Historia Apollonii regis Tyri. A Fourteenth Century Version of a Late Antique Romance, Toronto, 2019.

Éditeur : Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies
Collection : Toronto Medieval Latin Texts 36
XI+123 p. pages
ISBN : 978-0-88844-486-8
€ 17.50 (excl. TVA and shipping)

With its shipwrecked princes, pirates, princesses, the Historia Apollonii regis Tyri provided medieval Europe with one of its most popular and influential narratives. The tale incorporates many literary features characteristic of the ancient Hellenistic novel, but differs markedly from its Greek predecessors: its narrative is presented in condensed fashion, its description of characters and events is straightforwardly functional, and the style of its Latin simple. While these features make the Historia Apollonii an oddity among the ancient novels, they contributed to the appeal the story held for later readers and writers in medieval Europe. This edition provides a text of the Latin Historia Apollonii as a reader from the later Middle Ages might have encountered, from a manuscript written in Italy in the middle of the fourteenth century.

 

Source : http://www.brepols.net

 

J. Gerrish, Sallust's Histories and Triumviral Historiography

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Jennifer Gerrish, Sallust's Histories and Triumviral Historiography, Londres, 2019.

Éditeur : Routledge
168 pages
ISBN : 9781315437378
£105.00


Sallust's Histories and Triumviral Historiographyexplores the historiographical innovations of the first century Roman historian Sallust, focusing on the fragmentary Histories, an account of the turbulent years after the death of the dictator Sulla. The Histories were written during the violent transition from republic to empire, when Rome's political problems seemed insoluble and its morals hopelessly decayed. The ruling triumvirate of Octavian, Mark Antony, and Lepidus created a false sense of hope for the future, relentlessly insisting that they were bringing peace to the republic. The Histories address the challenges posed to historians by both civil war andauthoritarian rule. What does it mean, Sallust asks, to write history under a regime that so skillfully manipulates or even replaces facts with a more favorable narrative? Historiography needed a new purpose to remain relevant and useful in the triumviral world.In the Histories, Sallust adopts an analogical method of historiography that enables him to confront contemporary issues under the pretext of historical narrative.The allusive Histories challenge Sallust's audience to parse and analyze history as it is being "written" by the actors themselves and to interrogate the relationship between words and deeds.

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